Artistic Differences

Who do you prefer?

Fever

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Wrote My Way Out

In life we have a choice.

1) Sit around, bitch and blame others.

2) Pick ourselves up and do something.

Hamilton – “Wrote My Way Out” ( Nas, Dave East, Lin-Manuel Miranda & Aloe Blacc )

You? You get to choose.

Women’s March 2018

Power, we have it.

Many cities across our country and worldwide will be hosting marches this Saturday and/or Sunday January 20 & 21. Google women’s march and your city to find out the times/dates/locations of your city’s 2018 Women’s March.

San Diego 2018 Women’s March 10am Saturday January 20 located at the San Diego County Administration Building 1600 Pacific Highway Downtown San Diego

Fearsome strongly encourages you to show your support and attend a march near you. Our march’s Mission is to be a Pro-Peace and Pro-Inclusivity rally. I feel pretty sure your local march has a similar mission.

No time is more important than now to stand up and speak out, especially given today’s news that gives doctors and hospitals the license to discriminate due to personal and religious beliefs. Yes the power that is currently leading Washington will now allow Doctors and Hospitals to discriminate in the provision of healthcare.

As humans we must find our strength to speak out against injustice. There is strength in numbers and strength in visibility.

Fearsome has Pussy Hat, a Pussy Hat that was knitted especially for him by one of his dearest friends. He will be seen wearing it this Saturday morning as he marches here in San Diego. 

Words

Words are things.

Words get into you.

Words affect.

Words are powerful.

Be careful of the words you say. Be careful of the words you allow into you, your home and around those you love.

Write only good words, speak only good words, allow only good words and share only good words.

I am not perfect, may I strive toward good whenever I possibly can.

Good starts with me. Good starts right here, right where I am.

MLK

“We know through painful experience that freedom is never voluntarily given by the oppressor; it must be demanded by the oppressed. Frankly, I have yet to engage in a direct action campaign that was “well timed” in the view of those who have not suffered unduly from the disease of segregation. For years now I have heard the word “Wait!” It rings in the ear of every Negro with piercing familiarity. This “Wait” has almost always meant “Never.” We must come to see, with one of our distinguished jurists, that “justice too long delayed is justice denied.”
We have waited for more than 340 years for our constitutional and God given rights. The nations of Asia and Africa are moving with jet-like speed toward gaining political independence, but we still creep at horse and buggy pace toward gaining a cup of coffee at a lunch counter. Perhaps it is easy for those who have never felt the stinging darts of segregation to say, “Wait.” But when you have seen vicious mobs lynch your mothers and fathers at will and drown your sisters and brothers at whim; when you have seen hate filled policemen curse, kick and even kill your black brothers and sisters; when you see the vast majority of your twenty million Negro brothers smothering in an airtight cage of poverty in the midst of an affluent society; when you suddenly find your tongue twisted and your speech stammering as you seek to explain to your six-year-old daughter why she can’t go to the public amusement park that has just been advertised on television, and see tears welling up in her eyes when she is told that Funtown is closed to colored children, and see ominous clouds of inferiority beginning to form in her little mental sky, and see her beginning to distort her personality by developing an unconscious bitterness toward white people; when you have to concoct an answer for a five-year-old son who is asking: “Daddy, why do white people treat colored people so mean?”; when you take a cross county drive and find it necessary to sleep night after night in the uncomfortable corners of your automobile because no motel will accept you; when you are humiliated day in and day out by nagging signs reading “white” and “colored”; when your first name becomes “nigger,” your middle name becomes “boy” (however old you are) and your last name becomes “John,” and your wife and mother are never given the respected title “Mrs.”; when you are harried by day and haunted by night by the fact that you are a Negro, living constantly at tiptoe stance, never quite knowing what to expect next, and are plagued with inner fears and outer resentments; when you are forever fighting a degenerating sense of “nobodiness” — then you will understand why we find it difficult to wait.”

…Martin Luther King Jr  …April 1963

Hey Fearsome! Why you so quiet these days?

Flu

or something like it.

Damn this cold/flu thing. I started to feel something coming on right before the new year. Then I felt ok. Then I felt something coming on. Then I felt ok. Then I really felt something coming on. Then I thought I beat it because I again felt ok. Then last week it hit. Hit hard. Got a little better.

I had this trip to Florida and I felt as if I was on the mend so I made the trip. I had a good day flying and the next day I wasn’t feeling so good. Three days later and I’m just plain sick.

I don’t write when I don’t feel well. So hang in there and enjoy the daily beard postings.

I sit in a hotel room pretty much almost 24 hours a Day right now. I’m grateful the room and bed are comfortable. I head home Saturday. Hopefully I’ll be feeling better by then.