Childhood defined

Growing up in the 1960’s & 70’s childhood is easily defined by top 40 hits we listened to on our AM transistor radios.

Often just the first few bars of a tune from the period I can tell you who I was with, where I was and even familiar scents of the season in the air.

In the spring of 1974, two years after my elementary school was integrated, I can remember Cheryl getting me into a Soul Train line during recess just outside of the cafeteria as we danced through the line to this familiar, and now cherished, tune. Springtime brought with it the familiar fragrances of newly cut grass mixed with the scent of the freshly fried foods emitting from the cafeteria.

Integrated schools? Yes I am a child of segregation. My hometown had white and black schools until 1972. I was young and I thought it wonderful to have my new friends. Friends who were excited to join us, had rhythm and loved to dance. We had a ball with these new friends.

To this day I still don’t truly understand why segregation happened and why integration was  so resisted. I’m grateful that during my young life that progressive values toward better living, acceptance and understanding cane to fruition. It’s our job to keep marching forward no matter what obstacles lie in our way.

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Capital Treasures 4

After our enjoyable visit at the National Gallery it was time for our appointment at The African American History Museum.

National Museum of African-American History & Culture

Definately an amazing museum and wonderful addition to the Smithsonian, this museum is worth the visit. Still being the new kid on The Mall it was packed and tickets hard to come by. We enjoyed it immensely, but we will make a point to come back at a later date when it isn’t so crowded and can be enjoyed as a Museum of its caliber should be. I know they have a lot of people waiting to get in and that tickets are limited in number, but I think they could do better limiting the number of tickets issued to an even smaller number.

Contemplative Court Waterfall Fountain

The Contemplative Court Waterfall Fountain was worth the trip itself alone. Overwhelming. Fearsome had some tears to catch as I began to sob. Cleansing.

Jackie Robinson #42

Fearsome had more tears to catch as I choked up over Jackie’s jersey. One can see the faint reflection of Fearsome’s San Diego Padres hat in the glass just above the shoulder to the right of the Jackie’s face.

Jackie Robinson is truly an inspirational man of honor. Integrating baseball was not an easy task. Jackies strength was in his own personal restraint and self discipline. Fearsome highly recommends the movie about Jackie’s life. The movie is simply “42”. Jackie is one of Fearsome’s heroes.